Venous-Thrombosis

Deep Venous Thrombosis And Doppler Ultrasound

Deep Venous Thrombosis is a condition where blood clots form in the vein deep in your body, often in your legs. Oedema, leg pain, the warmth of the skin over the area of thrombosis are the most common clinical sign and symptoms.


An overview of Deep Venous Thrombosis

An abbreviation for DVT, the Deep Venous Thrombosis is a condition where blood clots form in the vein deep in your body, often in your legs. In addition, it can lead to even more serious problems such as a clot in the lungs. If not treated properly, it can be life-threatening too. Hence, it’s crucial to get tested if you have signs or symptoms including “Pain in Your Leg”. Even though the most DVT is occult as well as resolves spontaneously without complication, still nearly 300,000 death from DVT-associated massive pulmonary embolism (PE) takes place annually.

 

The most commune signs and symptoms for DVT are:

Oedema, leg pain (it occurs in approximately 50% of patients but is nonspecific), tenderness (it occurs in nearly 75% of patients), the warmth of the skin over the area of thrombosis.

 

Diagnosis of DVT Using Doppler Ultrasound:

In order to determine whether the patient is suffering from this health condition, Doppler Ultrasound plays an imperative role. It gives the physician a way to examine what’s inside your body without injections or X-rays. It indeed turns into images. It is employed by the experts in order to check for the issues with “Blood Flow” such as blockages in your arteries or clots in your veins. Therefore, it is considered one of the most effective ways to test for DVT.

 

Treatment for DVT:

The primary objective for the effective treatment of DVT or Deep Venous Thrombosis is to prevent PE or Pulmonary embolism, minimize the risk of developing the PST or postthrombotic syndrome, and reduce morbidity.

However, acute DVT can be easily treated in an outpatient setting with LMWH. Sufferers with low-risk PE may be safely discharged from the healthcare centre or hospital early. And, have to receive only outpatient treatment with LMWH followed by vitamin K. To add to your knowledge, non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants are also effective as well as safer than vitamin K antagonist regimen/LMWH.

 

Below are a few treatment options for DVT:

  • Endovascular and surgical interventions
  • Pharmacologic thrombolysis
  • Physical measures (eg, elastic compression stockings & ambulation)
  • Anticoagulation (a mainstay of therapy) – warfarin, Heparins, factor Xa inhibitors, and also several emerging anticoagulants
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