Human Amniotic Membrane and Wound Healing

Human Amniotic Membrane and Wound Healing


Human amniotic membranes (hAMs) have shown promising results in recent studies aimed at improving wound healing. Ben Samuel John and Coll conducted a study on the 2019 full-thickness skin defects in 4 groups of 6 rats with one wound each.

Skin is a barrier against noxious agents. It helps to maintain a stable water balance. Burn injuries, tumour resections, and chronic wounds are often responsible for large skin defects which need to be covered properly. Autologous and allogenous grafts are used to cover such defects. Among these, Human amniotic membranes (hAMs) have shown promising results in recent studies aimed at improving wound healing.
It provides a stable basement membrane for cell culturing, expresses anti-immunogenic and anti-inflammatory agents, and shows good results in the treatment of wound defects, such as a wound coverage.
Ben Samuel John and Coll conducted a study on the 2019 full-thickness skin defects in 4 groups of 6 rats with one wound each. Cultivated autologous keratinocytes and fibroblasts on the hAM were created. The wound contraction was evaluated every 10 days until wound closure
The rats treated with hAM showed a tendency toward a more prominent basement membrane in the resulting scar. This interesting aspect should be investigated further for its possible effect in the prevention of pathological scars.

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