SSI

Surgical Site Infection


SSI stands for Surgical Site Infection, an infection that occurs after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place. About 1 to 3 out of every 100 patients develop some infection after the surgical intervention.

About 1 to 3 out of every 100 patients develop some infection after the surgical intervention. Patients with diabetes have a risk of surgical site infection 50% higher than patients without diabetes. These numbers are not significant until it happens to you.

SSI stands for Surgical Site Infection, an infection that occurs after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place. It is often caused by bacteria and may develop ten days to several weeks after surgery.

The risk increases if the patient has medical conditions that cause a weak immune system (the most common of all is diabetes, no matter what patient’s BMI is), if he/she uses steroids to strength his/her immune system, has narrow or blocked blood vessels, smokes or is overweight, is older, or uses some sort of serious treatment because of other medical problem he/she might have (radiation or chemotherapy).

Here are the most common symptoms of an SSI:
• Fever
• Redness, swelling, and pain near the surgery area
• Red streaks coming from the surgery area
• Blood, fluid, or pus draining from your surgery area
• A foul odour coming from the surgery area

Most SSIs can be treated with antibiotics and proper wound care. Most clinical cases require the use of advanced dressings. Only a few cases may require the use of dermal substitutes to cover the wounds (such as hyaluronic acid ester matrix, naturally-occurring bladder matrix or platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

Have a look about the full article in the link.

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